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The Impact of Mental Workload Levels on Physiological and Subjective Responses
Majid Falahi 1, Majid Motamedzade 2, *, Zahra Sharifi 3, Rashid Heidari Moghaddam 4, Alireza Soltanian 5
Department of Occupational Hygiene, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of
Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran
Professor, Department of Ergonomics, School of Health and Research Center for
Health Sciences, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran 3 MSc Department of Occupational Hygiene, Faculty of Health, Sabzevar University of Medical Sciences, Sabzevar, Iran
Associate Professor, Department of Ergonomics, Faculty of Health and Medical

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اینجا کلیک کنید

Sciences Research Center, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical
Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
Associate Professor, Department of Biostatistics & Epidemiology, School of Public Health, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
* Corresponding author: Majid Motamedzadeh, Professor, Department of Ergonomics,
9000370351

School of Health and Research Center for Health Sciences, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran. E-mail: motamedzade@yahoo.com
Abstract
Introduction: Advances in technology and the use of complex systems at work have imposed high mental workloads to operators; so, continuous monitoring of mental workload can help to prevent mental problems and maintain mental health. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the impact of mental workload on physiological and subjective responses.
Methods: This cross-sectional descriptive-analytical study was performed on 16 healthy university students in 2014 at a laboratory setting. Physiological parameters of surface electromyography and electrocardiography in six blocks (resting, high mental work, moderate, low, very low and recovery) were measured using NeXus4-. After performing each block, the NASA-TLX questionnaire was completed. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS software version 21.0. A %5 significance level was adopted in all the tests.
Results: The results showed significant differences for the average score of NASA-TLX between the different levels of mental work load (P < 0.05). Also, the analysis of repeated measures variance showed significant differences for heart rate and heart rate variability parameters in the six blocks (P < 0.05), but no significant difference was observed for the shoulder muscles activity.
conclusions: Different levels of mental work load can impact on people’s subjective responses and some of their physiological responses. Thus, in such workplaces, it will be necessary to conduct an ergonomic program to manage mental health.
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